In the Same Breath
In the Same Breath
In the Same Breath
In the Same Breath
In the Same Breath
In the Same Breath
In the Same Breath
In the Same Breath
In the Same Breath
In the Same Breath
In the Same Breath
In the Same Breath
In the Same Breath
In the Same Breath
In the Same Breath



In the Same Breath, 2009
Photography group exhibition
Yair Barak, Adi Brande, Dror Daum, Asaf Evron, David Frenkel,
Sharon Glazberg, Yoav Gurfinkel, Ohad Matalon, Tomer Kep, Efrat Shalem,
Tamar Shakin, Yael Yudkovik, Hinda Weiss

Tavi Dresdner Gallery, Tel-Aviv
General installation view
In the Same Breath, 2009
Photography group exhibition
Yair Barak, Adi Brande, Dror Daum, Asaf Evron, David Frenkel,
Sharon Glazberg, Yoav Gurfinkel, Ohad Matalon, Tomer Kep, Efrat Shalem,
Tamar Shakin, Yael Yudkovik, Hinda Weiss

Tavi Dresdner Gallery, Tel-Aviv
General installation view
In the Same Breath, 2009
Photography group exhibition
Untitled (Berlin), Yael Yudkovik
Tavi Dresdner Gallery, Tel-Aviv
In the Same Breath, 2009
Photography group exhibition
Vice Versa, Yair Barak
Tavi Dresdner Gallery, Tel-Aviv
In the Same Breath, 2009
Photography group exhibition
Yair Barak, Adi Brande, Dror Daum, Asaf Evron, David Frenkel,
Sharon Glazberg, Yoav Gurfinkel, Ohad Matalon, Tomer Kep, Efrat Shalem,
Tamar Shakin, Yael Yudkovik, Hinda Weiss

Tavi Dresdner Gallery, Tel-Aviv
General installation view
In the Same Breath, 2009
Photography group exhibition
The Moon, Efrat Shalem
Tavi Dresdner Gallery, Tel-Aviv
In the Same Breath, 2009
Photography group exhibition
Untitled, Tamar Shakin
Tavi Dresdner Gallery, Tel-Aviv
In the Same Breath, 2009
Photography group exhibition
Untitled, Tomer kep
Tavi Dresdner Gallery, Tel-Aviv
In the Same Breath, 2009
Photography group exhibition
City Sacrifice, Hinda Weiss
Tavi Dresdner Gallery, Tel-Aviv
In the Same Breath, 2009
Photography group exhibition
Tavi Dresdner Gallery, Tel-Aviv
Installation view
In the Same Breath, 2009
Photography group exhibition
Tavi Dresdner Gallery, Tel-Aviv
In the Same Breath, 2009
Photography group exhibition
Untitled (Brothers), Tomer kep
Tavi Dresdner Gallery, Tel-Aviv
In the Same Breath, 2009
Photography group exhibition
Self Portrait with Chair, Hinda Weiss
Tavi Dresdner Gallery, Tel-Aviv
In the Same Breath, 2009
Photography group exhibition
Untitled (Blind Parrot), Asaf Evron
Tavi Dresdner Gallery, Tel-Aviv
In the Same Breath, 2009
Photography group exhibition
Backyard, the courtyard where Ron and Tami Arad were married
Dror Daum
Video loop on two screens, 5:28 minutes
Tavi Dresdner Gallery, Tel-Aviv
|+|In the Same Breath

The One – When using the phrase “in the same breath”, one means a combination of two things that initially oppose each other yet at a certain moment, the moment of speech, connect and integrate into one breathing space.

The exhibition wishes to display these “moments” in which the fantasy of “being together” overcomes, if just for a moment, the continuous rift that divides us. Each moment the viewer spends before the works of Hinda Weiss, Yael Yudkovik, Ohad Matalon or Yoav Gurfinkel is a moment of surrender to that very fantasy, a moment of dedication and sobriety.

Thus, the viewer, the artist and the curator become temporary collaborators in the same uncontrollable desire to become one, and then to fall apart in order to desire yet again.

Two – What separates “couple” from “two”? The photographs of Sharon Glazberg, Tomer Kep and David Frankel show that the difference between “two” and “couple” is in the context, in the eyes of the beholder. To perceive two as a couple they need to be seen through one of the constitutive mindsets of our culture. Two oranges (Glazberg) have become, through the camera lens, a pair of doves, alienating themselves from reality, here in the form of the withered and dried-up tree, and separating themselves from the rest of the oranges via their uplifting intimacy.

Contrary to this fantastical and ideal “couplehood”, it is precisely the staged photograph of the two brothers (Kep) that demonstrates the way in which what usually begins with (self-) duplication grows more and more complicated with time.

Control – Throughout human history we have been in pursuit of control and over the years we have refined ways in which to achieve it. When applying these methods, we impede what might have been had we not interfered. We have been “playing God” for many years – and nature has been like a marionette whose strings are in our hands. Yair Barak reminds us of our main device for gaining control – the omnipotent signifier. Through writing, through the text, through the set of signifiers, we have gained control of time, interpreting it according to our needs, constructed a magnificent history, completely “natural”, perfectly fictitious.

The Sublime – The works of Efrat Shalem, Assaf Evron (Blind Parrot) and Tomer Kep prove to us once again that “control” and “the sublime” cannot coexist. These two aspirations, despite their similar origin (fear of death?), address the ego differently: the first makes it erect, the second disintegrates it.

Time – The photographs of Adi Brande, Dror Daum (video) and Tamar Sakin remind us that death is the only form of existence, and time is the illusionary element of life. Daum, who photographs the courtyard in which Ron and Tami Arad were married, succeeds through the medium – video that looks like still photography – to express our desperate desire to freeze time, which in turn gently slips through our fingers or brutally pushes forward. Sakin, for her part, shows how the quintessential heterotopia, the cemetery, is the place of memory as intersection of mind and body.