Untitled (Balls)
Untitled (Balls)
Untitled (Balls)
Untitled (Balls)



Untitled (Balls), 2009
Lead, wax strings, maps of Israel, bicycle wheels
Tavi Dresdner Gallery, Tel-Aviv
Curator: Dresdner Tamar
Intallation View
Untitled (Balls), 2009
Lead, wax strings, maps of Israel, bicycle wheels
Tavi Dresdner Gallery, Tel-Aviv
Curator: Dresdner Tamar
Untitled (Balls), 2009
Lead, wax strings, maps of Israel, bicycle wheels
Tavi Dresdner Gallery, Tel-Aviv
Curator: Dresdner Tamar
Untitled (Balls), 2009
Lead, wax strings, maps of Israel, bicycle wheels
Tavi Dresdner Gallery, Tel-Aviv
Curator: Dresdner Tamar
|+|Topography \ Yair Barak

Yael Yudkovik presents us with pairs of bicycle wheels. In line with the readymade tradition, see Duchamp, she replaces the object’s function with a symbolic dimension. Outside the rims of the wheels are two pairs of balls, wrapped together like a pair of testicles, made of antique maps of Israel upon which Yudkovik drew the boundaries of her own map of Israel (invented, fictitious) and thus erased its familiar borders.

The map, which is an abstraction of multidimensional reality, seems to be here an allegory of the artist's act of abstraction. The symbolism of this work creates a system of signs that enable (and do not enable) the reading of the work from the inside out and vice versa. Likewise, the map offers a possibility to read and understand, but like any method of organizing knowledge, it always becomes an impermeable code that conceals more than it reveals.

Signification, indexical referencing and the creation of archives are the fundamentals of modernist creation. In 1978 William Jenkins curated the pioneering exhibition “New Topography: Photographs of Man-Made Landscapes” at the Museum of Photography in Rochester, New York. The exhibition introduced a group of photographers who had a new approach to landscape photography. No more glorification and worship, no yearning for the unattainable, but rather an act of marking and mapping the boundaries of intervention, of city/space/nature.

Jenkins viewed the works as a topography of double surfaces: physical and mental, natural and cultural. When Gerhard Richter presented Atlas he understood (perhaps more than anyone) the need and desire for art to be indexical, to produce a key that is an impossible map, impossible to read: a system that simulates a state of order and definition but at once becomes random and opaque.

Do maps enable an understanding of space? Is the act of mapping an elucidatory act? The assumption that the map is an abstraction of physical reality negates these possibilities. Abstraction runs contrary to description/elucidation/understanding.