Mop Up (Sponja)
Mop Up (Sponja)
Mop Up (Sponja)
Mop Up (Sponja)
Mop Up (Sponja)
Mop Up (Sponja)
Mop Up (Sponja)
Mop Up (Sponja)
Mop Up (Sponja)
Mop Up (Sponja)
Mop Up (Sponja)
Mop Up (Sponja)



Mop Up (Sponja), 2001
Video 3:21 min
Still image from video
Mop Up (Sponja), 2001
Video 3:21 min
Still image from video
Mop Up (Sponja), 2001
Video 3:21 min
Still image from video
Mop Up (Sponja), 2001
Video 3:21 min
Still image from video
Mop Up (Sponja), 2001
Video 3:21 min
Still image from video
Mop Up (Sponja), 2001
Video 3:21 min
Still image from video
Mop Up (Sponja), 2001
Video 3:21 min
Still image from video
Mop Up (Sponja), 2001
Video 3:21 min
Still image from video
Mop Up (Sponja), 2001
Video 3:21 min
Still image from video
Mop Up (Sponja), 2001
Video 3:21 min
Still image from video
Mop Up (Sponja), 2001
Video 3:21 min
Still image from video
Mop Up (Sponja), 2001
Video 3:21 min
Still image from video
|+|Mop Up (Sponja) \ Hadara Sheflan-Katsav

In “Mop Up (Sponja)”, Yael Yudkovik tries to return water to the sea while a pair of men’s underwear covers her head. The blocked view does not only “not see”; it also does not meet the gaze of the other nor the passion that marks this gaze. Oedipus blinded himself after he discovered his sin and thus also protected himself for the future: to never see what one should not see. As long as the gaze remains blocked, femininity remains denied – the very femininity whose jouissance exhilarates and whose waters break from their natural place and mix water with sand.

The obsessive repetition of cleaning the beach, of returning the water to the sea, expresses an attempt at filling the gap by using countless signifiers that repeat themselves. It is a striving for knowledge, for an answer, delightful the one moment, painful the next (for the gap is never filled).