Manpower
Manpower
Manpower
Manpower
Manpower
Manpower
Manpower



Manpower, 2005
Marking ink on newspaper
Braverman Gallery, Tel-Aviv
Curator: Tali Ben-Nun

International drawings, 2005
Pavillion De Arteixo, Museum of Art, Spain
Manpower, 2005
Marking ink on newspaper
Braverman Gallery, Tel-Aviv
Curator: Tali Ben-Nun

International drawings, 2005
Pavillion De Arteixo, Museum of Art, Spain
Manpower, 2005
Marking ink on newspaper
Braverman Gallery, Tel-Aviv
Curator: Tali Ben-Nun

International drawings, 2005
Pavillion De Arteixo, Museum of Art, Spain
Manpower, 2005
Marking ink on newspaper
Braverman Gallery, Tel-Aviv
Curator: Tali Ben-Nun

International drawings, 2005
Pavillion De Arteixo, Museum of Art, Spain
Manpower, 2005
Marking ink on newspaper
Braverman Gallery, Tel-Aviv
Curator: Tali Ben-Nun

International drawings, 2005
Pavillion De Arteixo, Museum of Art, Spain
Manpower, 2005
Marking ink on newspaper
Braverman Gallery, Tel-Aviv
Curator: Tali Ben-Nun

International drawings, 2005
Pavillion De Arteixo, Museum of Art, Spain
Manpower, 2005
Marking ink on newspaper
Braverman Gallery, Tel-Aviv
Curator: Tali Ben-Nun

International drawings, 2005
Pavillion De Arteixo, Museum of Art, Spain
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Manpower \ Tali Ben-Nun
For two whole years (2003–2005), day after day, Yael Yudkovik wrote a personal diary on the pages of the financial section of Haaretz newspaper. The words became sensual, palpable figures, written in a thick black marker. Expressionless, faceless and naked, they are supported by the graphs in the newspaper or contain them within like arteries, veins or internal organs, while the newspaper headlines supply them with random nicknames. The graphic illustrations of stock market share values and currency indices become an organic part of the sketches and express small yet unequivocal statements: growth or crash, potency or impotence.

A vague silhouette of a back, hollow outlines filled with a longing for something which was never hers, anger that has neither face nor name, the suggestion of an incomplete family. Yael devotes herself to the act of drawing-writing as if she were researching the science of anatomy – body follows body, line follows line, this is how she clarifies to herself that which has motivated and continues to motivate her. Another toddler, child, youth, man or woman, characters lacking sexual identity, only their pose tells their story – weak or vital, shy, old or dead. The troubling need to occupy a vertical-manly world, mature and immature, is stronger than her. Despite the coarseness of the cheap, gray and crumbling paper, Yael handles the drawn images with devotion and love.


Manpower \ Moran Goodes
What is the meaning of a female action that maps a space that is defined by being entirely a man's world? And when the action occurs, does it create a new kind of hierarchy or merely organize, with a trained and dedicated feminine touch, the master's house?

Yael Yudkovik's works are located in the tension created between these two extremes. They present no resolution but rather a research process. The investigation focuses on the aspect of gender: watchful female eyes inspecting the male identity not in opposition but through a third option, another kind of image.

Each study opens with a “What?”. But what happens when the “What?” of the object of study has been predefined? Yudkovik deals with this question by using given mediums and inverting them: in the series of drawings of men on the pages of the financial section of Haaretz newspaper, Yudkovik invades the testosterone-infused quintessential male-capitalist territory and fills it with silhouettes of men in different poses, stripped of their sophisticated business suits, lacking facial features and deprived of all human characteristics. The data concerning the state of the stock exchange now becomes a visual-graphic platform in which the curves indicating the rise and fall of the capital market combine organically with the male model drawn on top of them, functioning both as arteries and internal organs as well as graphs that gauge his “performance” and fluctuate between impotence and potency.

The drawings are at times naïve and at times more blunt: a man holding a grotesque penis in his hand in different masturbation positions or a man using his penis as a garden hose or ruler, alongside men in softer, brooding or even humiliated poses. The drawings are saturated with humor and alternate between castration and empathy.

Yudkovik performs a female action in the “capital market” through which she deconstructs and repositions those with potency and power. She formulates a different, androgenic sexuality, situated beyond the conventions that dictate a clear separation between men and women.